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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This was my third road trip in the ID.4. This time we had to drive to Huntsville, AL (from a northern Atlanta suburb) for my son's travel hockey league play weekend. Now that I'm an experienced EV longer tripper, I planned this trip weeks in advance, using the ABRP app. My plan was to top off the charge in the ID.4 at home to 90% the morning of the trip (from 80% charged to the night before) and then stop by an EA location in Woodstock, GA (behind the Bank of America building and in front of Walmart) to top off the SOC to 100% and then immediately continue on our way. My next charging stop was supposed to be in Fort Payne, AL, where I planned again to charge to 100% (this time I would have to pay - probably about $10). I would then arrive in Huntsville, AL with about 75% of charge, which would allow me to drive around Huntsville during the weekend and then get back to Fort Payne, AL on Sunday night (on my way back to my Atlanta suburb). At Fort Payne, I was planning to get enough charge to get me back home with about 10% of SOC. My total cost for DC charging would have been around $15-$20 - all at the ChargePoint DC charger in Fort Payne, AL on the way to Huntsville and on the way back.

The first part of my plan went well. I plugged in my home L2 charger in the ID.4 early in the morning before we left, and less than an hour later, the SOC was at 90%. We loaded the car within 30 minutes of having charged the ID.4 to 90% and left. About 30 minutes later we arrived at the EA location in Woodstock, GA. We arrived with 85% of SOC, and it took exactly 22 minutes to charge to 100%. Then continued on our way to Fort Payne, AL. A couple hours later, we arrived in Fort Payne AL with about 65% of SOC, and proceeded to the ChargePoint DC chargers at the back of the Railroad Depot museum. This is where our real adventure started. Downtown Fort Payne (not much of a downtown) was having a festival (god only knows what they were celebrating). There were some people walking on sidewalks, but no one on the roadway. I was exactly one short block from the museum, where the DC chargers are supposedly located. I pulled up next to the police cruiser parked in the turn lane at the entrance to that intersection, hoping to slowly proceed through the festival block to the museum. As soon as the cop saw me pulling in next to him, he turned on his siren, jumped out of his SUV, and walked to my driver window. He asked me where I was going, and if I didn't notice there was an event going on. I told him I was driving an EV with my family and dog in tow from Atlanta to Huntsville, AL for a sporting event, and we needed to get a charge at the DC charger one block away (about 60 yards) down the road. I told him this was the only DC charger on the entire way from Atlanta, and I needed to get a charge. He immediately put a smirk on his face and told me that there was no way in hell he would allow me to drive that 60 yards to the museum. I told him I would get stranded without this charge. He said no way I was driving that 60 yards. He eventually got on a radio with his chief to find out where else I could charge in town, and then he told me I could go to the local hotel and get a charge there. I told him that chargers at the hotel are slow chargers that take 10 hours to charge my car, and they are meant for overnight guests. He just smiled at me. Eventually, after much back and forth, he radioed his chief again and then told me there is a Chevy dealership in town that has a DC charger, and that was only other place to get a charge. So, I had to leave downtown and drive to the Chevy dealership (a 10-minute drive).

The experience at the Chevy dealership was really good. The manager welcomed us with open arms, and offered us to use their only DC charger for free. He also suggested that we test drive a Chevy Bolt EUV while we were waiting to compare the Bolt to our ID.4. We took him up on his offer, and went on a test drive of the supped up Chevy Bolt. I can't say I liked the car, but it was quite fancy inside with the top trim that we were driving. Instead of the rear-view mirror, it had a screen, which could be zoomed in and out, as well as zoomed in four different corners, etc. The Bolt also has a one-pedal option button, which turns it into a real one-pedal-drive EV like my Model Y. The manager let us go on our own without even suggesting he would come with us. When we came back, he welcomed us to his office and we had a nice discussion about the current state of EVs in the US. It was then that we found out that this dealership sells more EVs in the state of Alabama than all other dealerships combined. The manager told me they had over 70 Bolts on their lot right then, most of them undergoing the LG battery recall swapping. He also told me that he personally owned (or had) over 10 EVs, and that he only drives an EV to work (45-minute commute one way). However, when we asked him what he drives on long road trips, he told us that he only drives his Chevy truck when he takes his family on a road trip, as the charging infrastructure is not ready for long-distance EV travel yet. He also told us why there is a DC charger in downtown Fort Payne. Apparently, there was a local citizen who was an EV enthusiast. He petitioned the town for DC chargers. The town refused. Then, he got himself elected to the town council and pushed DC chargers from his new position. He also applied for multiple grants, and eventually he got a federal grant to bring DC chargers to downtown Fort Payne. It was because of this one citizen that Fort Payne has two DC chargers.

Unfortunately, the DC charger at the Chevy dealership could only supply 29 kW to our ID.4, and we were running late for the tournament in Huntsville, so we had to leave before we were able to charge to 100%. In fact, we only charged to 78%. We got to the Huntsville, AL hockey rink a few minutes before we were supposed to be there, so we made it one way despite the charging debacle in Fort Payne, AL.

However, Huntsville, AL doesn't have a single DC charger, while being the tech capital of the State of Alabama with its Space Center, Space Museum, and multiple high-tech enterprises located in the city. So, after the entire weekend of driving around Huntsville and after the tournament was over, we had about 30% of SOC left, which made it very risky trying to get back to Fort Payne on this amount of SOC. Additionally, by that time, we had lost all our faith in Fort Payne ChargePoint DC chargers as being a viable charging option, and our friendly Chevy dealer was closed because it was Sunday. What were our options? The only option we had was to drive west (opposite way of where we needed to drive to go home to Atlanta) for 35 miles to Athens, AL, where there was an EA DC charger at a local Walmart. That's what we had to do. It took us over 30 minutes to get there, then it took us about an hour to charge to 100%, and then it took more than half an hour to get back to Huntsville. So, two hours later, we were where we started off but now we had about 85% of SOC remaining. It was time for us to head back to Atlanta. By that time, all of our teammates were half the way home already. Because I decided to charge to 100% in Athens, and because we were navigating with ABRP, using an OBD dongle for real-time SOC reading, we knew we would get home with about 17% of SOC, so we decided not to stop by Fort Payne to try our luck again. Instead we drove straight home. Once we got on I75 north of Atlanta, I drove at 80-85 mph, while monitoring the ABRP prediction of the arrival SOC. In the end, we got home with 11% of SOC (the lowest we had done up till then). I'm now more comfortable relying on ABRP predictions, as they appear to be quite accurate.

The moral of this story is that while our trip was supposed to take 8 hours (4 hours there and 4 hours back), we ended up spending 6 hours on the way there and 6 hours on the way back because of the charging debacles and detours, and we also put an extra 70 miles on the car to make a charging detour from Huntsville to Athens on the way back from Huntsville to Atlanta. If it hadn't been for this amazing Chevy dealership in Fort Payne (Donohoo Chevrolet), and the incredible manager, who showed us the absolute best of the famed southern hospitality, we would have ended up in Huntsville with not enough SOC to get us to any DC charger on he way back. Our only option would have been to book another night at a local hotel in Huntsville where we could find an L2 charger (hopefully we could find one in Huntsville that has chargers) and spend another night in Huntsville. It would have cost us another $150-$200 for the hotel, my son would have missed school on Monday, and I would have lost another $700 in lost wages due to a missed work day.

My wife told me during and after this trip that she is done with taking EVs on a road trip. She is now demanding that we trade one of our two EVs for an ICE SUV.
 

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This was my third road trip in the ID.4. This time we had to drive to Huntsville, AL (from a northern Atlanta suburb) for my son's travel hockey league play weekend. Now that I'm an experienced EV longer tripper, I planned this trip weeks in advance, using the ABRP app. My plan was to top off the charge in the ID.4 at home to 90% the morning of the trip (from 80% charged to the night before) and then stop by an EA location in Woodstock, GA (behind the Bank of America building and in front of Walmart) to top off the SOC to 100% and then immediately continue on our way. My next charging stop was supposed to be in Fort Payne, AL, where I planned again to charge to 100% (this time I would have to pay - probably about $10). I would then arrive in Huntsville, AL with about 75% of charge, which would allow me to drive around Huntsville during the weekend and then get back to Fort Payne, AL on Sunday night (on my way back to my Atlanta suburb). At Fort Payne, I was planning to get enough charge to get me back home with about 10% of SOC. My total cost for DC charging would have been around $15-$20 - all at the ChargePoint DC charger in Fort Payne, AL on the way to Huntsville and on the way back.

The first part of my plan went well. I plugged in my home L2 charger in the ID.4 early in the morning before we left, and less than an hour later, the SOC was at 90%. We loaded the car within 30 minutes of having charged the ID.4 to 90% and left. About 30 minutes later we arrived at the EA location in Woodstock, GA. We arrived with 85% of SOC, and it took exactly 22 minutes to charge to 100%. Then continued on our way to Fort Payne, AL. A couple hours later, we arrived in Fort Payne AL with about 65% of SOC, and proceeded to the ChargePoint DC chargers at the back of the Rairoad Depot museum. This is where our real adventure started. Downtown Fort Payne (not much of a downtown) was having a festival (god only knows what they were celebrating). There were some people walking on sidewalks, but no one on the roadway. I was exactly one short block from the museum, where the DC chargers are supposedly located. I pulled up next to the police cruiser parked in the turn lane at the entrance to that intersection, hoping to slowly proceed through the festival block to the museum. As soon as the cop saw me pulling in next to him, he turned on his siren, jumped out of his SUV, and walked to my driver window. He asked me where I was going, and if I didn't notice there was an event going on. I told him I was driving an EV with my family and dog in tow from Atlanta to Huntsville, AL for a sporting event, and we needed to get a charge at the DC charger one block away (about 60 yards) down the road. I told him this was the only DC charger on the entire way from Atlanta, and I needed to get a charge. He immediately put a smirk on his face and told me that there was no way in hell he would allow me to drive that 60 yards to the museum. I told him I would get stranded without this charge. He said no way I was driving that 60 yards. He eventually got on a radio with his chief to find out where else I could charge in town, and then he told me I could go to the local hotel and get a charge there. I told him that chargers at the hotel are slow chargers that take 10 hours to charge my car, and they are meant for overnight guests. He just smiled at me. Eventually, after much back and forth, he radioed his chief again and then told me there is a Chevy dealership in town that has a DC charger, and that was only other place to get a charge. So, I had to leave downtown and drive to the Chevy dealership (a 10-minute drive).

The experience at the Chevy dealership was really good. The manager welcomed us with the open arms, and offered us to use their only DC charger for free. He also suggested that we test drive a Chevy Bolt EUV while we were waiting to compare the Bolt to our ID.4. We took him up on his offer, and went on a test drive of the supped up Chevy Bolt. I can't say I liked the car, but it was quite fancy inside with the top trim that we were driving. Instead of the rear-view mirror, it had a screen, which could be zoomed in and out, as well as zoomed in four different corners, etc. The Bolt also has a one-pedal option button, which turns it into a real one-pedal-drive EV like my Model Y. The manager let us go on our own without even suggesting he would come with us. When we came back, he welcomed us to his office and we had a nice discussion about the current state of EVs in the US. It was then that we found out that this dealership sells more EVs in the state of Alabama than all other dealerships combined. The manager told me they had over 70 Bolts on their lot right then, most of them undergoing the LG battery recall swapping. He also told me that he personally owned (or had) over 10 EVs, and that he only drives an EV to work (45-minute commute one way). However, when we asked him what he drives on long road trips, he told us that he only drives his Chevy truck when he takes his family on a road trip, as the charging infrastructure is not ready for long-distance EV travel yet. He also told us why there is a DC charger in downtown Fort Payne. Apparently, there was a local citizen who was an EV enthusiast. He petitioned the town for DC chargers. The town refused. Then, he got himself elected to the town council and pushed DC chargers from his new position. He also applied for multiple grants, and eventually he got a federal grant to bring DC chargers to downtown Fort Payne. It was because of this one citizen that Fort Payne has two DC chargers.

Unfortunately, the DC charger at the Chevy dealership could only supply 29 kW to our ID.4, and we were running late for the tournament in Huntsville, so we had to leave before we were able to charge to 100%. In fact, we only charged to 78%. We got to the Huntsville, AL hockey rink a few minutes before we were supposed to be there, so we made it one way despite the charging debacle in Fort Payne, AL.

However, Huntsville, AL doesn't have a single DC charger, while being the tech capital of the State of Alabama with its Space Center, Space Museum, and multiple high-tech enterprises located in the city. So, after the entire weekend of driving around Huntsville and after the tournament was over, we had about 30% of SOC left, which made it very risky trying to get back to Fort Payne on this amount of SOC. Additionally, by that time, we had lost all our faith in Fort Payne ChargePoint DC chargers as being a viable charging option, and our friendly Chevy dealer was closed because it was Sunday. What were our options? The only option we had was to drive west (opposite way of where we needed to drive to go home to Atlanta) for 35 miles to Athens, AL, where there was an EA DC charger at a local Walmart. That's what we had to do. It took us over 30 minutes to get there, then it took us about an hour to charge to 100%, and then it took more than half an hour to get back to Huntsville. So, two hours later, we were where we started off but now we had about 85% of SOC remaining. It was time for us to head back to Atlanta. By that time, all of our teammates were half the way home already. Because I decided to charge to 100% in Athens, and because we were navigating with ABRP, using an OBD dongle for real-time SOC reading, we knew we would get home with about 17% of SOC, so we decided not to stop by Fort Payne to try our luck again. Instead we drove straight home. Once we got on I75 north of Atlanta, I drove at 80-85 mph, while monitoring the ABRP prediction of the arrival SOC. In the end, we got home with 11% of SOC (the lowest we had done up till then). I'm now more comfortable relying on ABRP predictions, as they appear to be quite accurate.

The moral of this story is that while our trip was supposed to take 8 hours (4 hours there and 4 hours back), we ended up spending 6 hours on the way there and 6 hours on the way back because of the charging debacles and detours, and we also put an extra 70 miles on the car to make a charging detour from Huntsville to Athens on the way back from Huntsville to Atlanta. If it hadn't been for this amazing Chevy dealership in Fort Payne (Donohoo Chevrolet), and the incredible manager, who showed us the absolute best of the famed southern hospitality, we would have ended up in Huntsville with not enough SOC to get us to any DC charger on he way back. Our only option would have been to book another night at a local hotel in Huntsville where we could find an L2 charger (hopefully we could find one in Huntsville that has chargers) and spend another night in Huntsville. It would have cost us another $150-$200 for the hotel, my son would have missed school on Monday, and I would have lost another $700 in lost wages due to a missed work day.

My wife told me during and after this trip that she is done with taking EVs on a road trip. She is now demanding that we trade one of our two EVs for an ICE SUV.
I really appreciate these detailed stories to learn from. It made me decide to look up the EA network and ChargePoint network as examples. As far as I can tell the space between Jacksonville and Atlanta is about as sparse as the charging networks get in the entire country. I would have to agree with your wife: It does not make sense to have 2 EVs in that area if you need to take road trips. It might even make economical sense to rent a car for those trips. Until something gives like Tesla opening up their network or the universal network significantly growing, I would imagine you will have this kind of experience with almost any road trip out of your area.
 

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I've done dozens of long trips without issue in my car. Granted it's not using CCS. Sorry to hear you had a problem. I find just driving 70 MPH vs 85 MPH will save a huge amount of battery. Charging up to 100% seems crazy to me. I usually only charge up to 70-80%. But I guess if the charging infrastructure is that far apart, you gotta do what you gotta do.

The event in the town sounds like a really unusual situation. Plus, states like Alabama are late to the party for EVs. Hopefully the expansion of EVgo/EA and other networks will be proceeding at a good rate over the next few years and start filling in areas. The new contracts with travel plazas seems like it will help long distance trips too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The event in the town sounds like a really unusual situation
No sh*t. Except this was the only DC charger along my route upon which I based the entire weekend and the ability to use a non-Tesla EV for this particular trip. This is THE problem. When a town places its DC chargers in downtown locations that get blocked off for a festival (and who is to say that this town is not having festivals every other weekend?), then you have a huge problem on your hands when traveling in a non-Tesla EV. And what if this town turned off the downtown DC chargers due to some sort of utilities work or some other crazy scenario? This is not a tenable way to travel long distance.
 

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This was my third road trip in the ID.4. This time we had to drive to Huntsville, AL (from a northern Atlanta suburb) for my son's travel hockey league play weekend. Now that I'm an experienced EV longer tripper, I planned this trip weeks in advance, using the ABRP app. My plan was to top off the charge in the ID.4 at home to 90% the morning of the trip (from 80% charged to the night before) and then stop by an EA location in Woodstock, GA (behind the Bank of America building and in front of Walmart) to top off the SOC to 100% and then immediately continue on our way. My next charging stop was supposed to be in Fort Payne, AL, where I planned again to charge to 100% (this time I would have to pay - probably about $10). I would then arrive in Huntsville, AL with about 75% of charge, which would allow me to drive around Huntsville during the weekend and then get back to Fort Payne, AL on Sunday night (on my way back to my Atlanta suburb). At Fort Payne, I was planning to get enough charge to get me back home with about 10% of SOC. My total cost for DC charging would have been around $15-$20 - all at the ChargePoint DC charger in Fort Payne, AL on the way to Huntsville and on the way back.

The first part of my plan went well. I plugged in my home L2 charger in the ID.4 early in the morning before we left, and less than an hour later, the SOC was at 90%. We loaded the car within 30 minutes of having charged the ID.4 to 90% and left. About 30 minutes later we arrived at the EA location in Woodstock, GA. We arrived with 85% of SOC, and it took exactly 22 minutes to charge to 100%. Then continued on our way to Fort Payne, AL. A couple hours later, we arrived in Fort Payne AL with about 65% of SOC, and proceeded to the ChargePoint DC chargers at the back of the Railroad Depot museum. This is where our real adventure started. Downtown Fort Payne (not much of a downtown) was having a festival (god only knows what they were celebrating). There were some people walking on sidewalks, but no one on the roadway. I was exactly one short block from the museum, where the DC chargers are supposedly located. I pulled up next to the police cruiser parked in the turn lane at the entrance to that intersection, hoping to slowly proceed through the festival block to the museum. As soon as the cop saw me pulling in next to him, he turned on his siren, jumped out of his SUV, and walked to my driver window. He asked me where I was going, and if I didn't notice there was an event going on. I told him I was driving an EV with my family and dog in tow from Atlanta to Huntsville, AL for a sporting event, and we needed to get a charge at the DC charger one block away (about 60 yards) down the road. I told him this was the only DC charger on the entire way from Atlanta, and I needed to get a charge. He immediately put a smirk on his face and told me that there was no way in hell he would allow me to drive that 60 yards to the museum. I told him I would get stranded without this charge. He said no way I was driving that 60 yards. He eventually got on a radio with his chief to find out where else I could charge in town, and then he told me I could go to the local hotel and get a charge there. I told him that chargers at the hotel are slow chargers that take 10 hours to charge my car, and they are meant for overnight guests. He just smiled at me. Eventually, after much back and forth, he radioed his chief again and then told me there is a Chevy dealership in town that has a DC charger, and that was only other place to get a charge. So, I had to leave downtown and drive to the Chevy dealership (a 10-minute drive).

The experience at the Chevy dealership was really good. The manager welcomed us with the open arms, and offered us to use their only DC charger for free. He also suggested that we test drive a Chevy Bolt EUV while we were waiting to compare the Bolt to our ID.4. We took him up on his offer, and went on a test drive of the supped up Chevy Bolt. I can't say I liked the car, but it was quite fancy inside with the top trim that we were driving. Instead of the rear-view mirror, it had a screen, which could be zoomed in and out, as well as zoomed in four different corners, etc. The Bolt also has a one-pedal option button, which turns it into a real one-pedal-drive EV like my Model Y. The manager let us go on our own without even suggesting he would come with us. When we came back, he welcomed us to his office and we had a nice discussion about the current state of EVs in the US. It was then that we found out that this dealership sells more EVs in the state of Alabama than all other dealerships combined. The manager told me they had over 70 Bolts on their lot right then, most of them undergoing the LG battery recall swapping. He also told me that he personally owned (or had) over 10 EVs, and that he only drives an EV to work (45-minute commute one way). However, when we asked him what he drives on long road trips, he told us that he only drives his Chevy truck when he takes his family on a road trip, as the charging infrastructure is not ready for long-distance EV travel yet. He also told us why there is a DC charger in downtown Fort Payne. Apparently, there was a local citizen who was an EV enthusiast. He petitioned the town for DC chargers. The town refused. Then, he got himself elected to the town council and pushed DC chargers from his new position. He also applied for multiple grants, and eventually he got a federal grant to bring DC chargers to downtown Fort Payne. It was because of this one citizen that Fort Payne has two DC chargers.

Unfortunately, the DC charger at the Chevy dealership could only supply 29 kW to our ID.4, and we were running late for the tournament in Huntsville, so we had to leave before we were able to charge to 100%. In fact, we only charged to 78%. We got to the Huntsville, AL hockey rink a few minutes before we were supposed to be there, so we made it one way despite the charging debacle in Fort Payne, AL.

However, Huntsville, AL doesn't have a single DC charger, while being the tech capital of the State of Alabama with its Space Center, Space Museum, and multiple high-tech enterprises located in the city. So, after the entire weekend of driving around Huntsville and after the tournament was over, we had about 30% of SOC left, which made it very risky trying to get back to Fort Payne on this amount of SOC. Additionally, by that time, we had lost all our faith in Fort Payne ChargePoint DC chargers as being a viable charging option, and our friendly Chevy dealer was closed because it was Sunday. What were our options? The only option we had was to drive west (opposite way of where we needed to drive to go home to Atlanta) for 35 miles to Athens, AL, where there was an EA DC charger at a local Walmart. That's what we had to do. It took us over 30 minutes to get there, then it took us about an hour to charge to 100%, and then it took more than half an hour to get back to Huntsville. So, two hours later, we were where we started off but now we had about 85% of SOC remaining. It was time for us to head back to Atlanta. By that time, all of our teammates were half the way home already. Because I decided to charge to 100% in Athens, and because we were navigating with ABRP, using an OBD dongle for real-time SOC reading, we knew we would get home with about 17% of SOC, so we decided not to stop by Fort Payne to try our luck again. Instead we drove straight home. Once we got on I75 north of Atlanta, I drove at 80-85 mph, while monitoring the ABRP prediction of the arrival SOC. In the end, we got home with 11% of SOC (the lowest we had done up till then). I'm now more comfortable relying on ABRP predictions, as they appear to be quite accurate.

The moral of this story is that while our trip was supposed to take 8 hours (4 hours there and 4 hours back), we ended up spending 6 hours on the way there and 6 hours on the way back because of the charging debacles and detours, and we also put an extra 70 miles on the car to make a charging detour from Huntsville to Athens on the way back from Huntsville to Atlanta. If it hadn't been for this amazing Chevy dealership in Fort Payne (Donohoo Chevrolet), and the incredible manager, who showed us the absolute best of the famed southern hospitality, we would have ended up in Huntsville with not enough SOC to get us to any DC charger on he way back. Our only option would have been to book another night at a local hotel in Huntsville where we could find an L2 charger (hopefully we could find one in Huntsville that has chargers) and spend another night in Huntsville. It would have cost us another $150-$200 for the hotel, my son would have missed school on Monday, and I would have lost another $700 in lost wages due to a missed work day.

My wife told me during and after this trip that she is done with taking EVs on a road trip. She is now demanding that we trade one of our two EVs for an ICE SUV.
I’m surprised the sheriff in Ft Payne didn’t arrest you for not driving an f250 diesel…
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I’m surprised the sheriff in Ft Payne didn’t arrest you for not driving an f250 diesel…
Only because we were all white (except for the dog that is half black). I felt gears turning in his brain, trying to figure out how to punish me, but there was not much he could have done. I wouldn't want to be black in the same situation. The cop was enjoying our predicament - that's for darn sure.
 

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DC charging in downtowns is pretty rare in my state. I know of one in my metro area out of dozens. Even then, the focus should be on highway corridors for new installations.
 

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Whoa, the lack of CCS chargers in the US sounds pretty bad...

Here in Europe things are pretty good. I've driven an EV on our last three summer vacations from Denmark to southern Europe and back, roughly 4000 km each trip. My current EV is a Tesla, so the first two years I used the comprehensive Tesla network. But this year I decided to test how the other networks are doing, by trying to complete the trip without using Tesla chargers at all. That went pretty fine too!

We typically split the trip into two days on the way south with a sleep-over somewhere in Germany, and then the same same on the way back. Here is an example of our last leg from Germany to Denmark, a total of 866 km:

08:14-09:35Drive 148 kmBattery from 73%-23%
09:35-09:49ChargeBattery from 23%-68%
09:49-11:12Drive 157 kmBattery from 68%-21%
11:13-11:30ChargeBattery from 21%-69%
11:30-12:51Drive 156 kmBattery from 69%-24%
12:51-13:27Charge (long lunch break)Battery from 24%-93%
13:27-15:04Drive 187 kmBattery from 93%-35%
15:05-15:17ChargeBattery from 35%-64%
15:17-16:38Drive 159 kmBattery from 64%-16%
16:38Home

So that's about 866 km of driving in about 7h 42m, and 4 charging stops of about 1h 20 mins. In a gas car we probably have taken 2-3 quick 10 mins rest room breaks, and still the 30-30 mins lunch break, so the extra time was like 20 minutes. Not bad at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes, level 2. It was basically worth about 20 miles in the Hummer in the period of time we were there.
Good to know it’s there. Next time I will park there to charge and will take Uber to the hockey rink. LOL.

How much does it cost to charge the Hummer from 10 to 100% at EA or CP in Alabama? Love the Hummer. Saw one a few weeks ago in person in Orlando at the EA location.
 

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Plugshare is a great app/website when travelling. I use it all the time to find L2 charging.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Plugshare is a great app/website when travelling. I use it all the time to find L2 charging.
I use PlugShare. It wouldn’t have helped us. I didn’t have time for L2 charging along the way. The hotel we were required to stay in (hockey league requirement) doesn’t have L2 chargers. This is our second trip in the ID.4 to a hockey weekend, and both trips have been subpar with similar issues: no L2 chargers at the hotels and L3 chargers requiring long detours.

Moreover, as we all look forward to EVs becoming more prevalent, the entire charging issue will quickly deteriorate before it starts getting better.
 

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This is one of the reasons why people buy Teslas.

Now that I'm an experienced EV longer tripper...
An experienced EV road tripper wouldn't rely on a not previously visited charging location as a single point of failure without having a known suitable backup. Further, it appears that the single point of failure you chose at Fort Payne only has 2 stalls and a max charging rate of 62.5 kW - that location would be a hard pass for me if I were planning a trip. The 2-stall CCS locations near me are notoriously unreliable, and I doubt it's any different in Georgia/Alabama.

Still, glad you made it there and back in good order and hopefully learned where not to go in the future. (y)
 

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2018 Tesla M3 LR | 2021 VW ID.4 AWD
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@sirozha Sorry to hear about your misadventures but it is comforting to know that there are still some upstanding dealers out there. Almost tempting to fly across the country if I ever need a Chevy.
 
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